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SELECTBIO Conferences Lab-on-a-Chip & Microfluidics Europe 2019

Tuomas Knowles's Biography



Tuomas Knowles, Professor of Physical Chemistry and Biophysics, Department of Chemistry & Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge

We study the physical and chemical aspects of the behaviour of biopolymers and other soft systems. Much of our work has been focused on the physical aspects underlying the self-assembly of protein molecules. Self-organisation is the driving force generating complex matter in nature, and the process by which the machinery providing functionality in living systems is assembled. The goal of our research is to understand the physical and chemical factors which control the structures and dynamics of biomolecular assemblies, and the connections between the nanoscale characteristics of the component molecules and the physical properties of large-scale assemblies and their behaviour on a mesoscopic to macroscopic scale. The techniques used in our laboratory include biosensors, optical lithography, microfluidic devices and scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy. We work both with natural and synthetic polymers and our interests range from fundamental chemical physics to technological applications in material science and molecular medicine.

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Probing Proteins in Small Volumes

Wednesday, 19 June 2019 at 10:00

Add to Calendar ▼2019-06-19 10:00:002019-06-19 11:00:00Europe/LondonProbing Proteins in Small VolumesLab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2019 in Rotterdam, The NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

We have focused our efforts on exploring experimental strategies to provide a new window into protein self-assembly that are enabled by operation in small volumes and that do not have a bulk equivalent. We have shown that microconfinement achieved through droplet microfluidics allows the isolation of single nucleation events in protein aggregation and thus to study a rare event as single molecule resolution. Using this strategy we have also been able to develop an understanding of how aberrant misfolded protein states are transmitted from one molecule to another through time and space. More recently we have exploited measurements of mass transport through fluid streams under laminar flow conditions to generate a platform for probing protein-protein interactions under fully native conditions.


Add to Calendar ▼2019-06-18 00:00:002019-06-19 00:00:00Europe/LondonLab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2019Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics Europe 2019 in Rotterdam, The NetherlandsRotterdam, The NetherlandsSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com