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SELECTBIO Conferences Lab-on-a-Chip & Microfluidics World Congress 2017

Joseph Wang's Biography



Joseph Wang, Chair of Nanoengineering, SAIC Endowed Professor, Director at Center of Wearable Sensors, University of California-San Diego

Professor Joseph Wang, is currently SAIC Endowed Chair and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Nanoengineering at University of California, San Diego. Previously, he was a Professor of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU) and Director of Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors at the Biodesign Institute. He obtained his higher education at the Technion and being awarded his D. Sc. in 1978. From 1978 to 1980 he served as a research associate at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) and joined New Mexico State University (NMSU) at 1980. From 2001-2004, he held a Regents Professorship and a Manasse Chair positions at NMSU. Since 1980, 20 Ph.D. candidates and 130 research associates and visiting scholars have studied with Professor Wang.

Prof. Wang's research focuses on field of nanobioelectronics and nanorobotics. Wang’s interests include nanomotors, nanorobotics and nanoactuators, nanoscale barcodes, nanomedicine, wearable on body sensors and biofuel cells, bioelectronic detection of proteins and nucleic acids, microfabrication, self-assembly of nanostructures, microfluidic devices (Lab-on-a-chip), nanoparticle-based bioassays, bionanomaterials, management of diabetes, point-of-care clinical development of electrochemical sensing devices for clinical and environmental monitoring, on-body glucose biosensors, new surfaces and interfaces, sensor/recognition coatings, remote sensing, the development of techniques for ultra trace measurements and the design of on-line flow detectors. Prof. Wang's contributions have greatly enhanced the power and scope of applications of nanomachines and have had major impacts upon the fields of wearable sensors, the use of nanomaterials in bioanalysis, and upon the growing popularity of electroanalytical techniques.

Joseph Wang Image

Nanomotor-Microchip Diagnostics: Moving the Receptor in Microchannel Networks

Monday, 2 October 2017 at 17:45

Add to Calendar ▼SELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

This presentation will describe new motion-based microchip assays based on autonomously moving receptor-functionalized nanomotors. The new motor-based sensing approach relies on new capabilities of modern nano/microscale motors. Particular attention will be given to catalytic nanowire and microtube motors propelled by the electrocatalytic decomposition of a chemical fuel,  The increased cargo-towing force of new man-made nanomotors, along with their precise motion control within microchannel networks, versatility and facile functionalization, can be combined for developing advanced microchip systems based on active transport. The motion-based biosensing strategy relies on the continuous movement receptor-modified microengines through complex samples in connection to diverse ‘on-the-fly’ biomolecular interactions of nucleic acids, proteins, bacteria or cancer cells. A variety of receptors, attached to self-propelled nanoscale motors, can thus move around the sample and, along with the generated microbubbles, lead to greatly enhanced fluid transport and accelerated recognition process. Selective capture and transport of target DNA and cancer cells from raw complex body fluids will be demonstrated. Key factors governing such motion-based sensing will be covered. The resulting assays add new and rich dimensions of analytical information and offer remarkable sensitivity, coupled with simplicity, speed and low costs. We will discuss the challenges of implementing molecular recognition into the nanomotor movement and for generating well-defined distance signals. New microengines with a ‘built-in’ recognition capability, based on boronic-acid or molecularly-imprinted outer layers, will also be discussed. The latter obviated the need for the receptor immobilization. The greatly improved capabilities of chemically-powered artificial nanomotors could pave the way to exciting and important bioanalytical applications and to sophisticated nanoscale and microchip devices performing complex tasks.

Nanomotor-Microchip Diagnostics: Moving the Receptor in Microchannel Networks

Monday, 2 October 2017 at 17:45

Add to Calendar ▼SELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com

This presentation will describe new motion-based microchip assays based on autonomously moving receptor-functionalized nanomotors. The new motor-based sensing approach relies on new capabilities of modern nano/microscale motors. Particular attention will be given to catalytic nanowire and microtube motors propelled by the electrocatalytic decomposition of a chemical fuel,  The increased cargo-towing force of new man-made nanomotors, along with their precise motion control within microchannel networks, versatility and facile functionalization, can be combined for developing advanced microchip systems based on active transport. The motion-based biosensing strategy relies on the continuous movement receptor-modified microengines through complex samples in connection to diverse ‘on-the-fly’ biomolecular interactions of nucleic acids, proteins, bacteria or cancer cells. A variety of receptors, attached to self-propelled nanoscale motors, can thus move around the sample and, along with the generated microbubbles, lead to greatly enhanced fluid transport and accelerated recognition process. Selective capture and transport of target DNA and cancer cells from raw complex body fluids will be demonstrated. Key factors governing such motion-based sensing will be covered. The resulting assays add new and rich dimensions of analytical information and offer remarkable sensitivity, coupled with simplicity, speed and low costs. We will discuss the challenges of implementing molecular recognition into the nanomotor movement and for generating well-defined distance signals. New microengines with a ‘built-in’ recognition capability, based on boronic-acid or molecularly-imprinted outer layers, will also be discussed. The latter obviated the need for the receptor immobilization. The greatly improved capabilities of chemically-powered artificial nanomotors could pave the way to exciting and important bioanalytical applications and to sophisticated nanoscale and microchip devices performing complex tasks.


Add to Calendar ▼2017-10-02 00:00:002017-10-04 00:00:00Europe/LondonLab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics World Congress 2017Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidics World Congress 2017 in Coronado Island, CaliforniaCoronado Island, CaliforniaSELECTBIOenquiries@selectbiosciences.com